The narrative of a revolutionary soldier by joseph plumb martin a summary of chapter 5

Visit Website The life of a common soldier fighting on behalf of colonial independence during the American Revolution was a difficult one. Recruiters for the Continental Army targeted young and less wealthy men, including apprentices or laborers. Some like Martin enlisted voluntarily, while others were drafted.

The narrative of a revolutionary soldier by joseph plumb martin a summary of chapter 5

A Narrative of a Revolutionary Soldier A Narrative of a Revolutionary Soldier In the book A Narrative of a Revolutionary Soldier, Joseph Plumb Martin attempts to narrate some of the adventures, threats and experiences while he was serving in the revolutionary army campaigns.

The revolutionary war was between the Great Britain and the various colonies of the North America in order to gain independence. Martin narrates his experiences during the revolutionary campaigns while I the army.

He was a regular soldier who rose to the rank of a sergeant. Martin wrote the book from the perspective of a regular soldier and his narration is limited to his own experiences and observations on a first hand account.

According to martin Plumb narrations, the most definitive character of the soldiers who fought during the revolutionary war was endurance and determination. This is widely evident through Martins observations and narrations in his book.

This is first revealed through his own passion for being a soldier; he long wished to be one ever since he was a child but had to wait due to restrictions of his grandfather. He describes the incident when he was first enlisted as a soldier inas having obtained his hearts desire.

This portrays his passion and particularly his endurance for all those years he waited to be enlisted as a soldier. He viewed as his opportunity to prove his ability in his profession. His subsequent re-enlistments into the continental army in the following years for the sake of his friends symbolize an element of endurance and determination.

This is also evident through his first assignment to New York, where the British army had placed about soldiers.

The narrative of a revolutionary soldier by joseph plumb martin a summary of chapter 5

Martin asserts that the presence of men did not alter his mind; he further says that he did not mind even if they were fifteen times fifteen thousand people. To him numbers had no place in alteration of his determination [1]. Why would he want to serve in a private army that was filled with problems yet there was the militia whose military lives was full of gratification?

Martin does not give an account towards this. This was possibly due to the enduring nature of both Martin and his comrades. This ultimately symbolizes the enduring nature of Martin and his soldiers accompanied with lack of supplies from the American government.

The soldiers froze almost to death but still had their cause in mind.

A Narrative of Some of the Adventures, Dangers and Sufferings of a Revolutionary Soldier

There were not deterred to deviate from their cause. The unit was determined not to disintegrate despite the severe hardships.

The regular soldiers in the army never received adequate food, shelter and their monthly wages. There was difficulty in moving supplies during the winter season.

Martin further blames the solders severe suffering at the expense of their commanders who sat back to enjoy themselves while the regular soldiers were under harsh conditions trying to work for them trying to keep off the enemy [2].

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It raises concern why they were made to suffer yet their cause was for good reasons. The soldiers had voluntarily agreed to serve the nation; this reveals the enduring and determination that the soldiers had. The outcome of these sufferings and intimidation after eight years is that they turned out to be conquerors.

Martin believes that the ultimate factors that led to the victory of revolutionary war were the contribution of the continentals because he fought for them and fought by them. It was the discipline of the continentals that led to their unity and disintegration of the unit throughout the eight years of revolutionary campaigns.

Their efforts went unappreciated during the cause of the war and after war.

Mar 08,  · Watch video · Born in western Massachusetts in , Joseph Plumb Martin was the son of a pastor; at the age of seven, he began living with his affluent grandfather. Almost as soon as the Revolutionary War. A Narrative of a Revolutionary Soldier: Some of the Adventures, Dangers and Sufferings of Joseph Plumb Martin. with an introduction by Thomas Fleming, and a new afterword by William Chad Stanley. New York: Signet Classics. By: Martin, Joseph Plumb, Published: () Diary of a common soldier in the American Revolution, an annotated edition of the military journal of Jeremiah Greenman / By: Greenman, Jeremiah,

The oppression of the regular soldiers during the revolutionary war was evident when the regular soldiers went to the battlefields with little or no supplies of food, no shelter, and clothing and the environmental hardships during the winter season that led to the deaths of almost regular soldiers.

Martin further recalls that the soldiers were not paid their monthly salaries despite the hard battles they fought during the war times. Martin also asserts that oppression against the soldiers was fuelled by the superior officers who placed personal interests before them.

The Adventures Of A Revolutionary Soldier - Wikisource, the free online library

Their revolutionary efforts were not appreciated during the times of the war and after. During the narrations of Martin, we note that discipline was a vital virtue for the regular soldiers and Martin himself.

Right from his first enlistment into the continental army, he was assigned to defend New York. The assignment was for six months and his group consisted of inexperienced soldiers. Prior to the Great Britain invasion, his group received little training.

Although they lost the war, they were given further assignments which they consistently lost and after a series of losses, his group began to gain some experience and together with additional discipline led to their realization of their success.

Martin blames this humiliation as a result of lack of proper leadership among the superior army officers.By: Martin, Joseph Plumb, Published: () Diary of a common soldier in the American Revolution, an annotated edition of the military journal of Jeremiah Greenman / By: Greenman, Jeremiah, This item: A Narrative of a Revolutionary Soldier: Some Adventures, Dangers, and Sufferings of Joseph Plumb by Joseph Plumb Martin Mass Market Paperback $ In Stock.

Ships from and sold by lausannecongress2018.coms: A Narrative of a Revolutionary Soldier: Some of the Adventures, Dangers and Sufferings of Joseph Plumb Martin. with an introduction by Thomas Fleming, and a new afterword by William Chad Stanley.

New York: Signet Classics. A Narrative of a Revolutionary Soldier: Some of the Adventures, Dangers and Sufferings of Joseph Plumb Martin. with an introduction by Thomas Fleming, and a new afterword by William Chad Stanley. New York: Signet Classics. In the summer of , Joseph Plumb Martin enlisted in the Connecticut state militia at the tender age of 15; he later joined the Continental Army of General George Washington and served nearly seven years on behalf of the Revolutionary cause.

A Narrative of a Revolutionary Soldier In the book A Narrative of a Revolutionary Soldier, Joseph Plumb Martin attempts to narrate some of the adventures, threats and experiences while he was serving in the revolutionary army campaigns.

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