Ifemelu can write a blog about race without negative backlash

Published on October 21, This is a fun way to learn about writers who are out there connecting with readers through blogs.

Ifemelu can write a blog about race without negative backlash

I personally grew up writing blog posts, however, the topics I chose to share with my readers did not convey a specific theme and did not relate to any specific topic. Rather, I grew up writing blog posts about things that were happening around me, places I visited, and people I met.

I did not give myself any rules as to what I was going to share with my readers, how I was going to share it, and who I was going to share it with.

I simply sat down at the computer and began typing whatever came to mind. I did not provide my real name with my blog posts because I did not want voice to be heard by readers that I could have possibly known outside of the blogosphere.

Therefore when I was introduced to a couple of blogs in this Women in Literature class, I was able to read blog posts that did follow a specific topic and did inform readers about a specific theme, and I was able to read blog posts that did focus on a specific reader.

The blog posts on this website are composed by a multitude of authors; some of the authors chose to provide their names with their blog posts, while others chose to remain anonymous.

ifemelu can write a blog about race without negative backlash

I believe that the authors of the blog posts who chose to remain anonymous, chose to remain anonymous for the exact same reasons that I did when I would write a blog post. It is much easier to voice a personal opinion when we feel that we do not have a personal connection with our readers.

The blog posts that were composed on this website were all written stylistically different to each author. Some authors addressed personal experiences while other authors addressed more social and political issues that the media addresses.

A few of the blog posts also addressed race, ethnicity, and culture, so it obvious to me that a multitude of racially and cultural diverse women deal with body image issues. Most of the authors on Adios Barbie incorporated an image that supported the theme or message behind what they were writing.

Providing a visual aid allows the author to show exactly what type of body they are blogging to support, the type of body image they are aiming to provide justice for. The organization of the blog was very easy to navigate and provided specific links that allowed a reader to choose blog posts that related to a specific topic.

The blog posts on this website are also composed by a multitude of authors, of which most provide their first names. The blog posts on this website were very short, single thought posts which all provided a visual aid, and seemed to follow the same style of writing.

Unlike Adios Barbie, most authors on Chubby Bunnies addressed personal experiences and provided their own personal images of their selves. From the personal images that the authors provided made it again, obvious to see that a multitude of racially and cultural diverse women deal with body images issues and strive for the justification of the female body.

The organization of the blog was not as easy to navigate as Adios Barbie was, as there were no specific links that allowed a reader to choose a blog post that was related to a specific topic.

Race and Racism ThemeTracker

Raceteenth did not address feministic issues as these two blogs did. Raceteeth focused primarily on race and culture differences. Ifemelu does not address her blog posts to one specific reader or audience, however she does write primarily about personal issues that relate to her own culture, as she ties the naivety of the other cultures towards her own.

In this sense, Raceteenth is not a feminist blog, and I believe that her blog differs substantially from the latter discussed.

ifemelu can write a blog about race without negative backlash

No matter how a blog post is written, structured, or portrayed, there will still be a reader, there will still be audience, and a there will still be a voice to be heard.

I encourage people who do have something to say and who want their voice to be heard, to pursue blogging. Whether anonymously or not, if you have something to share, get out there and share it!My last blog post was a contribution to a “writing process blog hop,” but the truth is I haven’t been writing much lately.

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In part, that is because of my disenchantment with the experience of being a writer. There is a big difference between writing and “being a writer.” Working with.

Apr 20,  · I love to write, I love to talk, why did I never think to combine the two? It’s probably because I didn’t know anything about blogging. Sure, I’d skimmed through random blog posts that had appeared in the midst of my research on things like episode recaps or news stories. But other than that, I don’t actively read blogs.

I never have. Desiring more of her captivating prose, I chose Americanah, her intricate discussion on race in three countries and continents. Taking place in Nigeria, the United States, and England, Americanah can be viewed by many as a novel that is one of the premier looks on race over the last five years/5(K).

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Study 53 Final flashcards from Larissa M. on StudyBlue. Why does Blaines sister, Shan, claim that Ifemelu can write a blog about race without negative backlash? a. Ifemelu is a woman In one of her blog posts, Ifemelu says maybe it's time to just scrap the word racist and create a new label called Racial Disorder Syndrome with three.

Adichie's Ifemelu uses the blog as a medium to backlash against racism in America after she has encountered personal experiences through which she realizes that she is black. 1. The Black are Blackened in America Dear Non-American Black, when you make the choice to . Jul 14,  · But most of all, she wrote this book for herself, because she wanted to write a love story about hair and race and visa applications, about Nigerians in America.

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